Types of Vegetable and proper cutting



 
Types of vegetables

The term "Vegetable" refers to an edible plant or part of a plant, other than a sweet fruit or seed. Typically the leaf, stem, or root of a plant acquires the categorization, however the word is not scientific, and meaning is largely based on culinary and cultural tradition. For example, mushrooms are considered by some as vegetables, even though they are not plants.
Vegetables have wide and varied uses with the flexibility to be cooked or consumed raw, although Some require cooking to become edible. Savoury dishes are enhanced and complimented by vegetables, yet others bring their unique flavor to desserts, such as rhubarb pie and carrot cake.
Vegetable categories are based on their use in the kitchen.
Vegetables listed as root and tubers come from several unrelated families, but they all have fairly solid, uniform textures and are handled in similar ways. This is not scientific classification and is only one of many methods to categorize.

Vegetables Categories:
Root and tubers
Gourd and tender fruited
Seeds and pods
Leafs
Stalks, stems, shoots
Cabbages
Onions
Mushrooms

Roots and Tubers
Turnip
Radish
Carrot
Parsnip
Celery
root
Beet
Jicama
Sweet potato
Potato
Jerusalem artichoke
Rutabaga

Gourd and tender fruited
Avocado
Eggplant
Sweet and hot
peppers
Tomato
Cucumber
Pumpkin
Chayote

Seeds and Pods
Bean
Peas
Corn
Okra

Leafs
Spinach
Beet greens
Lettuces
Endive and chicory
Swiss cha
Sorrel
Kale
Watercress
Collards
Turnip greens
Stalks, stems, shoots
Globe artichoke
Fennel
Asparagus
Fiddlehead ferns
Celery
Bamboo shoots

Cabbages
Cabbage
Broccoli
Cauliflower
Brussels sprouts
Kohlrabi
Bok choy


Onions
Onion
Scallion
Leek
Garlic
Shallot
Mushrooms
Morels
Portobello
White Truffles
Champignon
Trumpet Royal
Porcini
Enoki
Red oyster


                            Vegetables cutting





Peeling and cutting procedure:

1.Peeling most vegetables as thinly as possible. Many nutrients lie just under the skin.
2.Cut into uniform pieces for even cooking.
3.To prevent loss of vitamins through oxidation and to combat drying, peel and cut as close to cooking time as possible.
4.For machine paring, sort vegetables for evenness of size, minimizing waste.
5.Potatoes, eggplant, artichokes, and sweet potatoes must be treated with an acid, such as lemon juice, or an antioxidant solution. Alternatively, hold under water until use.
6.Save edible trims for soups, stocks, and vegetable purées.
First, put in place the pad, to guarantee stability for accurate cutting.

Safety cutting
1.Prepare the green cutting board for use.
2.Wash hands thoroughly.
3.Wear a cut protection glove with a disposable glove on top on the hand making contact with the
4.vegetable, reducing risk of cross contamination.

Artichokes



1.Cut off stem.

2.Break off outer leaves.
3.Cut off remaining leaves above base.
4.Trim green outer peel.
5.Scrape out fuzzy choke.
6.Keep cut stem end from darkening during steaming or boiling: tie slice of lemon over cut surface.

Asparagus
1.Break off woody lower ends.
2.Remove lower scales or peel lower part of satalk. Cut Hips to uniform lengths and/or far lie then e bundles for cooking.
Peel the entire of the stalk when preparing white asparagus; purple asparagus no need to peel, just trim the bottoms.

1.Pare the stalk from about 2" (5 cm) below w tip down to base.
2. Cut off hard, woody bottoms of stem.
3. Peel the stem

Green Beans
1.Cut or snap off ends.
2.Remove any spots.
3.Leave whole or cut into desired lengths.

Bok Choy
1.Cut in half lengthwise and wash under running water to remove soil from the crooks of the stalks,
2.Trim bottom by cutting off a thin slice, or cut out core.
3.Cut as desired.
4.Small varieties may be cooked whole.

Broccoli
1.Split large stalks into smaller sizes for portioning.
2.Split thick stalks partway for faster cooking, or cut tops from stalks.
3.Tougher stalks may be peeled.

Brussels Sprouts
1.Trim bottom ends and remove yellowed outer leaves(but don’t cut off to much of the bottom or you will lose too manybleaves)
2.For more even cooking, pierce base with sharp knife point.

Cabbage
Remove coarse or discoloured outer leaves

1.Remove core and rinse whole, or cut into quarters and then remove core.
2.For wedges, core is left in, but with bottom trimmed, to hold sections together.
Cut cabbage head into quarters. Then cut out the core.
Cut into thin shreds.

Cauliflower
1.Remove leaves and trim tough part of stalk.
2.Cut away discoloured parts.
3.Separate into florets, leaving portion of centre stalk attached to each one to minimize trim loss. If cooking whole, cut out centre of stalk for more even cooking.

Cut out central core.
Separate cauliflower into florets.

Celery
1.Cut off root end.
2.Reserve leaves and tough outer stems for stocks, soups, mirepoix.
3.Ribbed outer side of stems may be peeled to remove strings.

Cucumber
1.Trim ends.
2.Peel if skin is tough or has been waxed.

Skin may be scored to make decorative slices (see pictures below).
Scoring with a channel knife.
Scoring with a for

Eggplants
1.Trim off stem end.
2.Peel if skin is tough.
3.Cut just before use.
4.Dip in lemon juice or antioxidant solution to prevent discoloration, if not to be cooked within a few minutes after peeling and cutting.

Fennel
1.Trim stems and feathery leaves.
2.Split in half through the base.
3.If the fennel is large, cut out the c core as for cabbage if it is fibrous or tough.

Garlic
1.Separate cloves as needed, or strike whole bulb with heel of hand to separate.
2.To peel cloves, crush slightly with side of heavy knife.
3.Peel and trim root e end.

Place garlic on worktable. Hold broad knife blade over it firmly with the palm of the hand.
You can now peel the garlic easily.
Chop or mince the garlic.
To make a paste of the garlic, sprinkle it with salt and mash it firmly with the back of the knife blade.

Mushrooms
1.Trim bottoms of stems.
2.Just before cooking, wash quickly in cold water; drain well.

If you desire to keep the mushrooms white, add a small amount of acid (lemon juice, ascorbic acid) to the rinse water.

Pepper
1.Cut in half lengthwise and remove core, seeds, and white membranes.
2.Peppers to be julienned or diced may have the interior ribs trimmed. Or leave whole (as for stuffed peppers) and cut out core from the end.
3.Peppers are often roasted and peeled as preparation for use in recipes.

a)Roast peppers over open flame until skins blacken. For large quantities, do this under a broiler or in a hot oven. In this case, the skins will not darken as much but can still b be peeled off.
b)Wrap the peppers in plastic film while they are still hot. This helps loosen the skins.
c)Peel off the loosened skin.

Spinach
1.Remove stems and damaged leaves.
2.Cut as required per recipe.

Zucchini
1.Trim ends.
2.Cut as required per recipe.

Tomatoes
1.For use with skin on wash and remove core.
2.To peel:

a)Plunge into boiling water 10-20 seconds (riper tomatoes take less time).
b)Cool immediately in ice water. Slip skins off and remove core.

 

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